How Maven Simplifies Outbreak Surveillance

February 11, 2020 Pam Schwartz

How Maven Simplifies Outbreak and Disease Surveillance 

For epidemiologists, information is vital to tracking, monitoring and containing evolving outbreaks as they emerge and develop every day, around the globe. 

No matter whether the focus is on measles, Ebola, cholera, sexually transmitted infections, or the 2019 Novel Coronavirus, accessing and maintaining outbreak information is crucial to every public health agency’s mission.   

That’s because epidemiologists and other public health professionals investigate outbreak information, searching for patterns and causes of disease and injury. They work tirelessly to help mitigate exposure to risks, along with the potential for loss of life. And they need the best possible tools to help detect, track and manage outbreak information.   

This is where Conduent is well-positioned to help, with its industry-leading health analytics solution, Maven®.  The Maven Disease Surveillance and Outbreak Management platform provides public health agencies with a highly configurable, flexible tool designed to help them react quickly to continuously evolving public health crises. 

This month, for example, Conduent will release a version of its Maven platform to securely track, manage and report on cases of the coronavirus, 2019-nCov. Conduent will host a coronavirus-enabled version of Maven in the company’s secure cloud so public health agencies and other organizations can get immediate access to use it. Conduent is also actively facilitating the sharing of best practices with clients as they work to configure their systems to track the outbreak. 

By using Maven, public health officials gain the flexibility to focus on what matters most – the health of people in the communities they serve.  

Other typical commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) solutions and customized software tools require vendor improvements and upgrades when outbreaks arise, or when the CDC issues changes to reporting requirements. Maven is different, however. It’s configured to support any public health program’s immediate needs, and can be modified on the fly, without relying on specialized software updates when an outbreak strikes, or changes arise in regulatory requirements.   

Public health officials who use Maven can start tracking and reporting on outbreak activity immediately. There’s no need to wait for a vendor to ramp up development activity or update new source code.   

How it Works 

Those who are trained to use Maven can leverage the solution’s scalability and flexibility to customize the platform on their own to track coronavirus. When an outbreak arises, a trained Maven administrator can add new data elements that must be collected about the disease. In addition, an administrator can: 

  • Create business rules to process the data accurately; 

  • Implement workflow processes to ensure that crucial information is routed to the right personnel; and  

  • Generate ad hoc reports to help present updated information to all necessary stakeholders.   

Because Maven is web-based, once a new disease ‘model’ is deployed to production, office and field personnel can access Maven via a web browser to enter new data and review existing outbreak information, based on individual job roles and requirements.   

Maven is quickly and easily configured to changing technologies, protocols and geographic locations. It provides an effective outbreak response solution – one that is designed to help ease data-sharing and integration among public health organizations as they fight on the front lines of battling disease.  

If you are seeking a powerful, flexible disease outbreak surveillance solution, Maven is worth a closer look.  Please visit us here or send an email to govhealthcare@conduent.com. 

 

About the Author

Pamela Schwartz is the Director of Public Health Consulting at Conduent Public Health Solutions. She has more than 15 years of experience in public health informatics, working in immunization information systems, disease surveillance systems, and prescription drug monitoring programs in corporate and government environments. Pamela recently earned her Master’s in Public Health from American Public University. She also holds a B.S. in Business Administration from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

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